International Studies

MAIS 5001 (0-0-0) International Job Shadowing

This course is an international shadowing experience where the student travels abroad to learn from a proficient foreign-based leader for a minimum of one business week accumulating 20-30 hours of job shadowing/training experience. The course functions like a capstone course for the program permitting an opportunity for the student to incorporate leadership and cross-cultural theories with practice as the student observes management or ministry strategies from a leader in an international context.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Summer.

MAIS 5301 (3-3-0) Contemporary Global Issues (Travel Study)

This course is designed to enhance awareness of global issues in a designated foreign country. The travel-study course covers a range of contemporary topics relevant to the region of travel: 1) ethnic and cultural factors that lead to conflict; 2) international social justice issues; 3) cross-border global issues; 4) the intersection of state and religion; 5) technology; and 6) other issues relating to globalization.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Fall.

MAIS 5302 (3-3-0) Geopolitics Through the Lens of Geography

This course is an overview of the specific unique characteristics of regions of the world related to their culture, economy, topography, climate, politics, and environmental factors. The course examines the importance of geography in geopolitics with emphasis on current issues of regional and global development.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Spring, Online.

MAIS 5303 (3-3-0) Christian Perspectives on Global Religions and Worldviews (S-L)

This course examines beliefs and practices of religious traditions and worldviews around the globe and their effect on culture, geopolitics, and business. Through careful examination and analysis, students compare and contrast major religions and worldviews from a Christian perspective, and how the practice of these global beliefs impacts today's world. This course contains a field-based service-learning component.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Spring.

MAIS 5304 (3-3-0) International Peace and Conflict Studies

This course explores the political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors associated with transnational conflicts and assesses different approaches to conflict resolution. The course covers the role of religion in conflict and peace studies, theories of conflict resolution in international relations, and case studies of various conflicts.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Summer.

MAIS 5305 (3-3-0) Cultural Intelligence

This course examines the theory and application of cultural intelligence (CQ) for the purpose of enhancing cross-cultural engagement. With a deepened knowledge of the components and implications of CQ, students are better prepared to avoid misunderstandings, misalignment, and missed opportunities. As students learn how to best apply CQ within cultural interactions, they will become more effective as culturally-attuned thought leaders and collaborators in business ventures, diplomatic relations, and international ministry opportunities.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Summer, Online.

MAIS 5310 (3-3-0) Short-Term International Immersion Experience (S-L)

This course is designed as a minimum four-week immersion venture in a foreign country which allows the student to gain first- hand knowledge and experience of that country’s civilization and culture alongside exposure to foreign language acquisition, global business strategies, governmental practices, international ministry programs, or non-government organizations. This course allows students to gain valuable hands-on experience from an international organization through an internship supervised by a mentor in a leadership position. This course contains a field-based service-learning component.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Summer.

MAIS 5313 (3-3-0) Urbanization and Development

This course surveys the causes and effects of rapid urbanization in developing countries by forming foundational theories of economic development and urbanization through an historical lens. It explores how public governance and economics affect urban development. The course studies why countries urbanize and examines the development of systems in cities as a result of urbanization. Specific civil and social challenges such as income, poverty, health, human capital, and innovation arising from the emergence of rapidly growing cities of the developing world are highlighted. Regional perspectives are also considered beginning with the United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Summer, Online.

MAIS 5314 (3-3-0) International Relations: The Human Market

One can hardly pick up a newspaper or watch the news without reading or hearing about human rights abuses. Stories of genocide, refugees, war crimes, or political prisoners have captured international attention. Although the subject of human rights has been discussed for hundreds of years, it was not until the 20th century that an internationally recognized covenant on human rights was formulated and adopted by the United Nations. The atrocities associated with World War II initiated a great effort among states and international organizations to make human rights a critical part of international law and diplomacy.   

 This course will seek to define human rights as well as establish whether universal human rights exist. The students will examine the role human rights play in foreign policy, the importance of economic rights as well as personal integrity rights. The students will also discover how a Christian worldview shapes the understanding of human rights. In addition, the course will discuss the reasons why governments abuse their citizens and examine the way human rights are studied by political scientists.  

Requisites: None.

Offered: Spring, Periodically.

MAIS 5315 (3-3-0) International Ethics: The Gray Line

What do we owe one another as citizens? Does the United States have an obligation to be the peacemaker of the world? What is a good life? How do we as an unapologetically Christian university answer these ethical questions? The course explores how philosophers have answered such important questions historically, evaluates contemporary issues, and discover how Christians in a globalized world ought to make decisions from a biblical worldview. Topics include controversies about equality and inequality, individual rights and the common good, the role of government and markets, and conceptions of identity and community. Case studies include ethical questions arising from the pandemic, cloning, and recent debates about global reparations.  

Requisites: None.

Offered: Spring, Periodically.

MAIS 5316 (3-3-0) An International Threat: Global Health Issues

This course introduces the student to global health through a sociopolitical lens. Students will study social determinants of health, the global burden of disease, health equity, health governance, critical institutions, and international collaboration to improve health globally. This course will also explore the theological implications of global disease and the role of global health as a mission.  

Requisites: None.

Offered: Summer, Periodically.

MAIS 5317 (3-3-0) Comparing Government Structures and Political Systems

(POLS 5317)

The study and application of theories and concepts related to the scope of comparative politics and methods of comparing various aspects of political systems. The principles, structure, and operation of selected contemporary federations will be compared to each other and the federations of the North American continent. Special attention will be paid to the impact of contrasting cultures, geography, rule of law, and topography in the development of different governmental systems.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Fall, Online.

MAIS 5318 (3-3-0) International Political Economy

International Political Economy (IPE) rests at the intersection of politics and the production, distribution, and consumption of scarce resources. IPE considers the flows of such production, distribution, and consumption across national borders, recognizing that not just national governments play a role, but foreign governments and international institutions must also be taken into consideration. How should governments intervene in a market-based economy? Is there room for “benevolent” intervention by regulators and what efficiency is lost in that process? These are but a few of the questions that will be considered in this course.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Fall.

MAIS 5319 (3-3-0) International Security: The Trigger Point

Why do countries go to war? Are the reasons unique to each situation, or are there any generalizable determinants of war? This course is a systematic exploration of these questions. 

 Our approach is organized around five levels of analysis. In each unit, we will closely examine the major theories and debates that shape the study of war in international relations. We will explore features of the international system and discover when and why the system has been war-prone. The course will drill down to the domestic level, exploring whether certain types of countries are more or less likely to go to war. In addition, we will examine dyads, asking whether the qualities of pairs of states make them more or less likely to go to war. The class will analyze individual leaders, exploring the roles they play in war and will evaluate international relations and conflict through a Christian worldview. 

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Spring, Periodically.

MAIS 6306 (3-3-0) Cross-Cultural and Global Leadership

(MAL 6306)

In this course, students will explore the nuances of leading in cross-cultural and global contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the opportunities and challenges that leading in diverse cultural environments brings and will study the skills and factors necessary to lead effectively in such environments. The critical goal of the course is to prepare students to adapt their leadership styles to be able to lead in these types of complex contexts with people from various cultures.

Requisites: None.

Offered:  Fall.